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CTBA experts are available to provide insight, analysis, and data to the press on a wide range of public policy issues. In addition, CTBA disseminates new research and timely updates on policy developments to the media.

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February 20, 2024Chicago Tribune

The Democratic governor’s scheduled speech before the Illinois General Assembly follows his pledge last week to allocate $182 million in the next budget year for shelter and other services for asylum-seekers in the Chicago area. The proposed investment came just a few months after the Pritzker administration announced it was taking $160 million from the current budget to address the ongoing crisis. Ralph Martire Ralph Martire, executive director said he expects “a slightly more austere budget” this year compared to the last couple years. “The structural deficit is going to rear its ugly head again this year,” Martire said. He speculated the proposed answer will likely be relatively smaller investments in certain services, rather than tax increases. And while revenue from federal and corporate taxes may be less than in recent years, the effects of that will be somewhat mitigated by the softer-than-expected economic landing from the pandemic.

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February 20, 2024Chicago Tribune

The Democratic governor’s scheduled speech before the Illinois General Assembly follows his pledge last week to allocate $182 million in the next budget year for shelter and other services for asylum-seekers in the Chicago area. The proposed investment came just a few months after the Pritzker administration announced it was taking $160 million from the current budget to address the ongoing crisis. Ralph Martire Ralph Martire, executive director said he expects “a slightly more austere budget” this year compared to the last couple years. “The structural deficit is going to rear its ugly head again this year,” Martire said. He speculated the proposed answer will likely be relatively smaller investments in certain services, rather than tax increases. And while revenue from federal and corporate taxes may be less than in recent years, the effects of that will be somewhat mitigated by the softer-than-expected economic landing from the pandemic.

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February 20, 2024Bloomberg

Governor J.B. Pritzker outlined his spending plan for the fiscal year starting July 1. After back-to-back annual budget surpluses, Pritzker will have to find ways to close a budget gap that is only expected to widen the next few years. CTBA's Ralph Martire is quoted “There are going to be pressures coming the governor’s way,” Martire added that he doesn’t expect to see any cuts in spending, but the state will take “a slightly more austere approach.”

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January 19, 2024Chicago Sun-Times

Some people believe everyone has equal opportunities, regardless of race. However, the list of inequitable systemic polices singling out Blacks is long, Chicago Sun-Times guest columnist Ralph Martire writes.

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November 3, 2023Daily Herald

Daily Herald guest columnist Ralph Martire writes that what our nation needs now is leadership that can build trust across ideological lines and create a unifying path forward despite our differences.

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August 11, 2023WBEZ

Chicago Public Schools is getting a slightly smaller increase in state funding than it was expecting. Loretto Hospital workers reached a tentative contract agreement with hospital leaders. The Illinois Supreme Court plans to issue an opinion today on the state’s ban on assault weapons. CTBA's Allison Flanagan sums up the caution of looking at CPS K-12 EBF Adequacy at face value.

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July 24, 2023Chicago Sun Times

Illinois has over-relied on local property taxes to fund K-12 education, effectively tying educational quality to local property wealth that is markedly lower in segregated Black communities. The Supreme Court ruled that universities can’t use affirmative action to level the educational playing field, so it’s up to state government to do so, Ralph Martire writes.

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June 14, 2023Crain's Chicago Business

Guzzardi’s Illinois House bill would tax the unrealized portfolio gains of billionaires at the income tax rate for individuals of 4.95%. Skeptics say this kind of proposal could run counter not only to the Illinois constitution’s uniformity clause, but also to a provision that there will be only one tax on income. “Does taxing unrealized gains count as income?” says Ralph Martire, executive director at the nonprofit Center for Tax & Budget Accountability. “That question will come up.”

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April 18, 2023Daily Herald

If consumer services such as landscaping were subject to Illinois' sales tax, it could generate billions for the state and allow legislators to reduce tax rates overall. CTBA Executive Director and Roosevelt University Rubloff Professor of Public Policy, Ralph Martire comments on a recent three-year budget forecast issued by the state legislature's Commission on Government Forecasting and Accountability that reports the state could expand its tax base by applying a sales tax to service-based businesses.

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April 13, 2023WSIU TV

Ralph Martire joins Jennifer Fuller on WSIU’s In Focus to talk about state spending on higher education ad CTBA’s new report, Why Illinois Should Enhance its Investment in Higher Education.  The program aired on Thursday, April 13, 2023, at  7:00 pm across all the WSIU PBS stations (Carbondale, Olney, Macomb, Springfield, and Quincy), WSIU, WUSI, WMEC, WSEC, WQEC. Not in the WSIU viewing area?  Watch the segment any time at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLED-h9ncHk

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